Navigator’s Canadian Arty-Facts

Associate Consultant
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Posted on January 1, 2017

Navigator’s favourite off-the-beaten-track art galleries in the cities where we live and work

01. The Power Plant, housed in what was an actual power plant until 1980, is a public gallery dedicated to showcasing new works. The gallery features a brick façade and a restored smokestack, harking back to Toronto’s rich past.

02. The OAG was founded in 1998 after Ottawa artists pushed for a gallery to better serve the local community. Today, the OAG has a growing permanent collection and loans works for special display in institutions, including the Senate and Rideau Hall.

03. For more than 40 years, the Bearclaw Gallery has promoted the development of Canadian First Nations and Inuit art. After Prime Minister Justin Trudeau presented a Cree artist’s sculpture to President Barack Obama this year, the gallery has received more attention than ever.

04. Founded in 1966, the Glenbow is dedicated to collecting objects that celebrate the history and culture of Western Canada. The gallery boasts one of Canada’s largest archives and has been a cultural hub of Albertans for 50 years.

05. There is more to experience in Regina besides life on the Prairies. The city’s largest public art gallery has been a long-time supporter of Indigenous artists, and boasts 4,000 pieces in its permanent collection.

06. Located in Old Montreal, DHC/ART is one of the city’s top galleries, presenting contemporary art from around the world. The non-profit gallery is known for featuring award-winning exhibitions in a variety of media, including art, film, music, design and technology.

07. The contemporary White Cube art gallery was originally established in 1993 and has expanded into a group of international venues. The White Cube Bermondsey facility is a refurbished warehouse and the largest of the White Cube sites, housing a number of impressive exhibits.

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